23
May 2016

Source: imgur

We law students love an obscure case… For many, an injection of humour results in greater comprehension of legal principles and court decisions. In my Media and Communications Law elective this semester, we covered the topics of criminal and civil contempt. Whilst not denying that contempt of court is a serious issue, as an act that undermines public confidence in the judicial system, I thought I’d share with you some of the more amusing facts, as extreme examples of what not to do when you next visit court…

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20
May 2016

At the time of the OJ Simpson trial, I was probably learning to walk and understand words like ‘juice’, ‘glove’ and maybe ‘murder’ given that I was one of identical twins entering the terrible twos.

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17
May 2016

In memoriam of Prince, Survive Law has taken a brief look into the legal legacy left by the flamboyant performer.

Apparently, his Royal Purpleness was just as experienced in law as he was in the entertainment industry, with The Hollywood Reporter claiming that Prince’s “legal skirmishes are nearly as legendary as the music”.

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06
May 2016

Source: Bravo via Giphy

More than a few of you probably use The Real Housewives of Melbourne as a crucial procrastination tool. I know I do. Who can blame us? I certainly have a lot more fun hate-watching Lydia hate-watch Pettifleur try on every item of clothing in an opulent Dubai shopping mall than I do reading about the intricacies of making a statement of claim.

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22
Apr 2016

I know, we all love Suits, myself included (just finished a binge of all 5 seasons actually, and now anxiously awaiting the 6th). But I think it’s time to dispel some myths. It got the long hours and mountains of paperwork correct but there are a few things that fall a bit short of reality...

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08
Mar 2016

Survive Law's Leanne Rogers dives into Greg Urbas's Cybercrime textbook to give you the scoop on crime's new frontier.

Gregor Urbas’ Cybercrime: Legislation, Cases and Commentary delivers exactly what its title promises – cybercrime legislation, cases and commentary. What was once an “obscure backwater of law and criminology” is now a ubiquitous topic, with the ‘Internet of Things’ having impacted almost every facet of modern life. Yet it is surprising that very few Australian law schools teach this as a substantive subject in its own right – rather, cybercrimes are woven into other disciplines as an ‘afterthought’. In fact, before hearing about this book, the limited knowledge I had of dodgy dealings on the interwebs came from the pop-culture likes of The Matrix, Law and Order, and the recent series CSI: Cyber.

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