02
Oct 2013

This semester you’ve been busy socialising, writing assignments 24 hours before they are due, and all of sudden, exams are now on the horizon. Before you go freaking out, drink five coffees and move all your worldly possessions to the library in a panic, here are the answers to some commonly asked questions about that dreaded first set of law exams…

Read More...
 
26
Sep 2013

The first time I found out that I had a take home exam, I breathed a sigh of relief. I figured, how hard could it be, it’s just like a glorified essay. How naïve I was. Many consider a take home exam to be easier than a sit down exam, but in reality take home exams are very much underestimated.

What they don’t tell you is that sure, it will be like a mixture of an essay and problem solving question, but it will be epically longer and expected to be more detailed. So how do you handle take home exams?

Read More...
 
09
Apr 2014

Finding the ratio decidendi of a case has to be one of the trickiest skills to master at law school. Lecturers explain that ratio is the rationale for the decision, but when you’re at home trying to write a case note, it can feel like ratio decidendi is really Latin for “good luck with that”. 

Here are some tips for tracking down that elusive ratio

Read More...
 
18
Sep 2013

While law students who attend night classes may be jealous of those who have the luxury of going to classes during the day and are able to go home, watch TV and get to bed at a reasonable hour, night time classes have their benefits too. I know my concentration levels are at their peak from about 4-9 pm, so I love evening lectures.

But studying and working full time means it’s not always easy to stay focused in night classes. Here are some of the strategies I’ve used to stay attentive and get the most out of attending law school at night…

Read More...
 
09
Sep 2013

We all know that cramming isn't the most effective way of studying. The stress leading up to exams impacts how you store and recall information, meaning that you may remember words and phrases, but probably haven't forged the connections between different pieces of information and how they tie in together.

To give yourself the best chance of remembering details of cases in the exam, start now, before you're stressed and while you have time to form the requisite pathways in your brain.

This is a technique I learnt from a friend, which can be used to improve memory and retention when studying. This approach works best as a prompt for memory as you progress through the semester and means that (hopefully) by exam time you have saved most of the information you need in your long term memory and just need to recall and apply it.

Read More...
 
03
Sep 2013

When we’re given a law assignment, our typical response is to reach for legislation, case law, journal articles and textbooks, but the research needn’t stop there. 

Take a look at some of these interesting legal resources to help your assignment stand out from the crowd, and have your marker thinking to themselves, “That’s really interesting!” and “I didn’t know that!” as they write a giant ‘HD’ on your feedback form…

Read More...
 

Join our mailing list

1