27
Jun 2013

When I first applied for the Juris Doctor, it was a little known degree and there were few course options available. So when I was accepted into a law degree, I simply enrolled. 

Eighteen months, four subjects and a deferred semester later, I found myself applying all over again. By this time I had learned much more about the application process and different law schools’ offerings. The universities, now interstate from where I finished school and studied for my undergrad degree, had different entry requirements; some had LSATs, others had different names for their degrees and varied compulsory subjects. I was amazed that in the same country, the same degree could mean so many different things. 

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24
Jun 2013

The first thing you notice about Rand is her beaming smile. A first-year University of Wollongong law student, she tells me she got into law for the same reason as many other law students. ‘In Egypt my grades were high,’ she laughed. ‘So I went with the law.’

Rand Faied has a Bachelors degree in Sharia law and Egyptian law from the University of Alzai in Alexandria, Egypt. Despite that, she is redoing her law degree at UOW. After coming to Australia in 2009 - following her graduation - she knew she still wanted to pursue law, despite the difficulties she encountered.

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20
Jun 2013

When planning to study law in Florence, a lot of questions came to mind. Would I get any study done? Is gelato a breakfast food? Is there such thing as too much pesto? Has Melbourne rendered me a coffee snob?

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14
Jun 2013

It seems that law lecturers around the country employ some pretty crazy techniques to keep us engaged during class. Some may offer a brief reprieve from stoic concentration with a random YouTube video every 30 minutes during a lecture (as I experienced in one subject), but we’re also increasingly experiencing highly creative teaching methods from our beloved lecturers.

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14
Oct 2014

As the nightmare of late night study, spent pens and furiously tabbed notes draws to an end, spare a thought, if you will, for the person on the other side of your exam booklet: the examiner.

Sure, they may very well be the Devil Incarnate or the Absolute Jerk of Exam Marking. Truth is, us examiners have 2, maybe 3 weeks to wade through hundreds of exam papers in the grand Aristotelian search for meaning in the madness…or just a correct case citation. Or any citation. Please cite something. From the right jurisdiction. Antarctica is not a jurisdiction. Chinese law is hardly binding. Economic duress is a bewildering argument when restraint of trade was clearly the better argument. And no, really, it is not okay to continue citing the Trade Practices Act when it has been replaced by the Australian Consumer Law.

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