07
Feb 2010

The thing I enjoy most? Probably the thrill. It is fantastic being on the pointy end of law and being involved (sometimes) in making new law.” -Joshua Knackstredt, Barrister

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07
Feb 2010

In your previous life, you were an overachiever. Think high gear. If you have come straight from high school, you breezed through aceing at least several subjects while keeping up with a steady stream of extra -curricular activities – sports, band, mock trials, prefect and student representative positions and a packed schedule of wild and infamous parties.

If law school is your second life pursuit after climbing to the top in another profession – banking and finance, advertising, media and journalism , psychology, medicine – you may consider the next few years an opportunity to add yet another notch on the bedpost achievements of your life so far.

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07
Feb 2010

“I had this plan on how I should live my life. How everything worked. In work, I was so organised, I never fucked up. My therapist couldn’t understand how I was really abnormally productive for someone who was so depressed.” – Lisa Pryor, Author/Columnist & law graduate.

As a law student, you have it all. Intelligence, wit, the elusive prestige of a competitive course – let’s face it: you’re even better looking than your average university student. What you study is more socially vital than any other pursuit – except, perhaps, medicine – for law is the foundation of society, making you, as a lawyer-in-training, its moral pillar.

You don’t sleep too much, because you are so very busy and important. After all, who needs sleep when you have No-Doz, V, Red Bull, or a double-shot macchiato? True, the cocktail of stimulants – and, occasionally, other drugs – circulating your system means that sometimes, you need some chemical assistance to sleep or even function. Hardly unusual in your high-achieving social circle, but don’t bring it up over Friday night drinks.

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07
Feb 2010

It's no secret that depression is prevalent in Australia's law schools and legal fraternity. While there is no silver-bullet solution to a problem as complex as depression, there is plenty we can all do to ensure our mental wellbeing.

These five key tips and tricks were developed in consultation with Associate Professor Vijaya Manicavasagar, Director of Psychological Services with the Black Dog Institute and Brett Smout, Head of UTS Counselling. Both are seasoned clinical psychologists.

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07
Feb 2010

Given the multiple sources from which you are expected both to draw from and understand, making notes can seem a little daunting.

Kathryn Millist, in-house counsel to Stockland advises that you make your notes according to the length of each set reading. We suggest you bring those notes to class and consolidate your class and readings notes for the exam. It sounds like a lot of work – and it is. Hence we recommend study groups.

“I don’t think there is a short-cut to making notes,” said Millist. “Half of it can be mind-numbingly boring. You need to distract yourself – then read it over.”

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07
Feb 2010

Legal essays are a strange quirk of study. While they are the bane of your existence throughout your law school life, stealing time and driving you to sleep-deprived delirium at least twice every semester, they cease to bear much significance as a practicing lawyer – unless you choose an academic career or publish legal research.

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